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Publications Listing

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Recently Published Articles

Tao, Y., Roulier, L.M., Higgins, K.M., Hayes, M.L., Halley, R.B., and Hudson, J.H., 1999, Digitized images of coral growth bands, fluorescent growth bands, and their age assignments from cores of Montastrea annularis, Biscayne National Park, Upper Florida Keys: CD-ROM Open-File Report 99-340.

Halley, R.B., and Yates, K.K., 1999, Sediment production is critical to reef restoration: Program and Abstracts, International Conference on Scientific Aspects of Coral Reef Assessment, Monitoring, and Restoration, Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., p. 97-98.

Halley, R.B., Prager, E.J., Stumpf, R.P., Yates, K.K., and Holmes, C.H., 1999, Sea-level rise and the future of Florida Bay in the next century: USGS Program on the South Florida Ecosystem, Proceedings of the South Florida Restoration Science Forum, Boca Raton, Fla., USGS Open-File Report 99-181, p. 34-35.

Morton, R. A., and McKenna, K., 1999, Analysis and projection of erosion hazard areas, Galveston and Brazoria counties, Texas: Journal of Coastal Research Special Issue 28, p. 106-120.

    Long-term changes in shoreline position along the southeastern Texas Gulf Coast were documented by conducting a real-time kinematic differential global positioning system (GPS) field survey in 1996 and comparing that shoreline with others archived in a geographic information system. The linear regression statistical function of the Shoreline Shape and Projection Program (SSAPP) was used to calculate the average annual rate of shoreline change at shore-normal transects spaced 45 m apart along the shore and to estimate position of the erosion reference feature and associated flood hazard zones in 60 years.

    Results show that:

    • beach morphology, shoreline movement, and regional geologic framework are closely interrelated,
    • Gulf beaches are generally retreating,
    • rates of retreat have accelerated locally, and
    • the degree of dune and backbeach modification is correlated with the intensity of beach scraping.

    Field surveys and statistical analyses also demonstrate that:

    • the high water line (HWL) mapped on T-sheets and aerial photographs undergoes large seasonal fluctuations and therefore is a less reliable indicator of shoreline position than the vegetation line, berm crest, crest of washover terrace, or backbeach erosional scarp, and
    • the shape of the projected shoreline is so sensitive to perturbations in the 1996 shoreline that long-term projections tend to produce unrealistic results.
    • GPS field monitoring of shoreline change reference features that are more stable than the HWL has the potential of greatly reducing the unexplained variability (error) in shoreline position and ultimately improving the accuracy and reliability of shoreline position models.

Publications Sent to Geologic Division Publications Groups

  • Chavez, P., Jr., Isbrecht, J., Galanis, P., Gabel, G.L., Sides, S.C., Soltesz, D.L., Ross, S.L., and Velasco, M.G., Processing, mosaicking, and management of the Monterey Bay digital sidescan-sonar images: Marine Geology.

  • Eittreim, S.L., Anima, R.J., and Stevenson, A.J., Seafloor geology of the Monterey Bay continental shelf: Marine Geology, Special Publication.

  • Gardner, J.V., Hughes Clarke, J.E., and Mayer, L.A., Cruise report, RV Coastal Surveyor cruise C1-99, Multibeam mapping of the Long Beach CA continental shelf: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report.

  • Gardner, J.V., Mayer, L.A., and Hughes Clarke, J.E., The bathymetry of Lake Tahoe (California-Nevada): Geological Society of America Bulletin.

  • Halley, R.B., Prager, E.J., Yates, K.K., Holmes, C.W., and Stumpf, R.P., Modern sediment budgets and mudbank growth in Florida Bay: GSA Meeting, Oct. 99.

  • Kvenvolden, K.A., Gas hydrates and us humans: Annals of the New York Academy of Science (for Third International Conference on Gas Hydrates).

  • Kvenvolden, K.A., Hostettler, F.D., Rosenbauer, R.W., and Lorenson, T.D., Hydrocarbons in near-surface sediment of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary: Marine Geology, Special Publication.

  • Poppe, L.J., Knebel, H.J., Haase, E.J., and Parolski, K.F., Sidescan imagery and surficial geologic interpretation of the Long Island Sound sea floor in New Haven Harbor, Connecticut (abs.): Geologic Society of America, National Meeting, Denver, CO, October 25-28, 1999.

  • Ravizza, G., Tuit, C.B., and Bothner, M.H., Os isotopes as tracers of sewage dispersal in the marine environment (abs.): Annual Meeting of the Geochemistry Society, Goldschmidt Conference, August 1999.

  • Swarzenski, P.W., Corbett, D.R., Smoak, J.M., and McKee, B.M., The use of U-Th series radionuclides and transient tracers in oceanography—An overview: Book chapter, Royal Academy of Chemistry.

  • ten Brink, U., Dillon, W.P., Frankel, A., Mueller, C., and Rodriguez, R., Seismic and Tsunami Hazard in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report, electronic:

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