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Staff & Center News

USGS Vessel Used to Test Counter-Terrorism Surveillance Equipment

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Scientists from the University of South Florida (USF)'s Center for Ocean Technology (COT) recently demonstrated equipment for underwater counter-terrorism surveillance to U.S. Coast Guard observers in New Orleans. The equipment provides constant underwater surveillance with real-time video and three-dimensional sonar along piers, ship's hulls, and seawalls. Captain Richard Young of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Science Center in St. Petersburg, FL, accompanied the scientists aboard the USGS research vessel G.K. Gilbert during the July 29 demonstration in Tampa Bay.

Images of an object (in photograph, top) produced from data collected simultaneously with the Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON; image at lower left) and the Laser Line Scanner (lower right).
Images of an object (in photograph, top) produced from data collected simultaneously with the Dual frequency IDentification SONar (DIDSON; image at lower left) and the Laser Line Scanner (lower right). The two types of data are gathered with a single pass. An interesting summary of DIDSON can be viewed on the DIDSON Summary Web page. Images provided by USF COT.

G.K. Gilbert Left: The research vessel G.K. Gilbert is used for diving, buoy servicing, data calibration, coring, sidescan-sonar and archeological surveys, remotely-operated-vehicle (ROV) deployment, red-tide tracking, fisheries science, at-sea education, and aquifer, mine, and spring research. Photograph provided by Richard Young.

"What comes back to us is not just a picture, but a continuous 3-D image we can rotate and view from any angle," said Larry Langebrake, COT's director.

The system also provides high-resolution three-dimensional color images of what it scans, and a georeferencing system allows analysts to pinpoint the location of objects. The technology, developed with a grant from the Office of Naval Research, is extremely useful in helping port security officials to monitor underwater environments for suspicious objects and changes. The system can scan and image 3,000 ft of seawall in 10 minutes.

For more information about COT, visit the COT Web page.

Related Web Sites
St. Petersburg Science Center
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
USF Center for Ocean Technology
University of South Florida (USF)

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Drilling Monitoring Wells in the Dry Tortugas

American Samoa's Resilient Coral Reefs

Seepage Samplers in Ashumet Pond

Research Wastewater - A Potential Threat to Florida Keys

Gulf of Mexico Vulnerable to Hurricanes

Outreach USGS Pacific Science Center Open House

Exhibit Designers Interested in Hurricane Research

USGS Hosts Science-Learning Session

Meetings Shore and Beach Preservation Conference

Deep Water Coral Research Workshop

Awards Jim Estes Wins Shoemaker Award

Four Publications Win Shoemaker Awards

Gene Shin Wins Shifting Baselines Contest

Staff & Center News NMSF Regional Office Moving to St. Petersburg, FL

Elena Nilsen Joins Coastal and Marine Geology Team

USGS Vessel To Test Counter-Terrorism Equipment

Dave Reid Wins Triathlon

Publications Southern Sea Otter Video Online

Human Influence on San Francisco Bay Floor

U.S. Coastal Cliffs

October Publications List U. S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
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Updated May 06, 2014 @ 02:11 PM (JSS)