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National Geographic Program to Include USGS Science in the Everglades

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Gordon Anderson is filmed while he uses a sediment elevation table
Above: USGS scientist Gordon Anderson is filmed while he uses a sediment elevation table to measure the relative elevation of wetland sediment. [larger version]

National Geographic videographer gets a shot with a "bird's-eye view" from an 80-ft-high tower
Above: National Geographic videographer gets a shot with a "bird's-eye view" from an 80-ft-high tower instrumented to measure atmospheric carbon dioxide and other climatic parameters. [larger version]

A National Geographic film crew working on a program about the Florida Everglades visited several U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data-collection platforms in Everglades National Park on January 25, 2008. The crew filmed scientists Gordon Anderson (USGS) and Karen Balentine (contracted to the USGS through Jacobs Technology, Inc.) as they conducted field measurements and assisted Everglades National Park hydrologist Vic Engel, who had invited them to participate. The National Geographic crew, supervised by Brian Armstrong, filmed work being done as part of a joint study between the USGS and the National Park Service. During filming, the two USGS scientists assisted Engel in taking measurements for his study of atmospheric carbon dioxide. In addition, the National Geographic crew filmed Balentine and Anderson measuring coastal sediment at a sediment elevation table—a portable, mechanical leveling device for measuring the relative elevation of wetland sediment.

The final film product, a 50-minute TV program slated for National Geographic television, has the working title "Secret Everglades" and follows two previously released programs called "Secret Yosemite" and "Secret Yellowstone." All are part of a series about America's National Parks timed to coincide with the National Parks Centennial Initiative, a presidential initiative to enhance our national parks during the decade leading up to their 100th anniversary in 2016. The Everglades program is expected to air in the fall, and DVD copies should be available for sale at the park's visitor centers and National Geographic's online store by the end of 2008.

Related Web Sites
Dynamics of Land Margin Ecosystems: Historical Change, Hydrology, Vegetation, Sediment, and Climate
USGS (U.S. Geological Survey)
National Geographic Channel
National Geographic

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Iron Biogeochemistry in the Gulf of Alaska

Sea-Floor Survey Off Key Largo

Research Coral-Reef Builders Vulnerable to Ocean Acidification

Outreach USGS Everglades Science in National Geographic Program

Lidar for Lunch at Propeller Club

Meetings Northern Gulf of Mexico Land-Cover Characterization Workshop

Awards Best Publication in The Condor

Athearn Receives Scholarship

Staff Tour of NOAA Aircraft Facility

Publications New Tool for Water Managers

March Publications List U. S. Department of the Interior | U.S. Geological Survey
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Updated May 06, 2014 @ 02:12 PM (JSS)