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Awards

Western Region Biologists Receive 2006 Department of the Interior Honor Awards

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Several biologists conducting research in coastal areas were among the recipients of U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) Honor Awards celebrated at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Western Region Awards Ceremony held October 12, 2006, at the USGS center in Menlo Park, Calif.

James Winton
Above: Research microbiologist James Winton, recipient of a DOI Distinguished Service Award. Learn more about Winton and his work on his employee profile.
USGS research microbiologist James R. Winton received a Distinguished Service Award, the highest departmental honor award that can be granted to a career employee. Winton's award was presented to him at a DOI ceremony in Washington, D.C., on May 4, 2006, but it was celebrated again at the Western Region ceremony, where USGS Western Regional Deputy Director Brian Cole read the award citation, noting that Winton was being honored "in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the U.S. Geological Survey on the diseases of Pacific and Atlantic salmon. Dr. Winton has been instrumental in saving salmon listed as threatened or endangered. He developed an application of a new molecular approach for rapid and precise detection and control of several major viral and bacterial pathogens of salmon and trout, and applied the approach to develop new vaccines to control diseases. His work has been critical to salmon recovery and to protecting important stocks through improved hatchery practices. Many of the technologies pioneered by his research have been transferred to Federal, State, tribal, and private-sector laboratories to help solve problems in fishery biology. Dr. Winton's research has formed the basis for improved methods currently used by resource managers to operate State and Federal fish hatcheries, as well as the worldwide aquaculture industry. Because of his specialized knowledge, Dr. Winton became one of the principal designers of a state-of-the-art USGS Fisheries Laboratory in Seattle. The facility is the most advanced center for fish-health research in the Nation and is frequented by international visitors seeking information for their own research facilities. For his outstanding contributions to the USGS, Dr. James R. Winton is granted the highest honor of the Department of the Interior, the Distinguished Service Award."

Dirk Derksen presents a DOI Meritorious Service Award to R. Mike Anthony
Above: USGS supervisory wildlife biologist Dirk Derksen (left) presents a DOI Meritorious Service Award to USGS research zoologist R. Mike Anthony in a ceremony at the USGS Alaska Science Center in Anchorage on October 13, 2006. Learn more about Anthony and his work on his staff biography. [larger version]
USGS research zoologist R. Mike Anthony received the Meritorious Service Award, the second-highest departmental honor award that can be granted to a career employee. Anthony was unable to attend the ceremony in Menlo Park but received his award the next day in a ceremony at the USGS Alaska Science Center in Anchorage. As noted in his award citation, Anthony was honored "in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the U.S. Geological Survey in the field of waterfowl management. He is internationally recognized for his research on the management of major waterfowl species in significant population decline, particularly Pacific black brant and dusky Canada geese of the Arctic. In seeking ways to reverse these declines, Richard Anthony developed methods to identify important predators of each species, leading to techniques and procedures that have been adopted by researchers and managers in North America and Europe. He developed aerial-videography and digital-imagery techniques to improve monitoring of Pacific black brant colonies and to reduce the impact of their primary predator, the arctic fox. He has also developed methods leading to significant discoveries about bald eagles being an important nest predator of dusky Canada geese. His internationally published research has been instrumental in bringing sound science to the complex issues of managing declining migratory-waterfowl species. For his outstanding contributions to the USGS, Richard M. Anthony is granted the Meritorious Service Award of the Department of the Interior."

For their research on the effects of mercury on bird reproduction in the San Francisco Bay and Delta, USGS scientist Josh T. Ackerman and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service scientist Collin Eagles-Smith each received a Superior Service Award, which is granted by DOI for significant acts, services, or achievements that materially aid the successful accomplishment of the DOI mission. Eagles-Smith was honored as "the lead U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) scientist on a joint USGS/USFWS study to investigate the effects of mercury on bird reproduction in the San Francisco Bay and Delta for the past several years. This CALFED-funded project has far-reaching implications for evaluating the impact of mercury on birds in both field and laboratory settings, establishing new standards for avian health criteria that will provide a foundation of toxicological understanding that will last for many years to come. Results from these studies will also aid in establishing appropriate protections for avian wildlife affected by mercury contamination." Addressing Eagles-Smith as he received his award, Brian Cole said: "You have spent the past two years tirelessly dedicating yourself to the largest joint project that the USGS Western Ecological Research Center has engaged in. Your efforts have made this joint project extremely successful and resulted in high praise. In addition, you have been the primary lead on compiling the required Quarterly Reports and have taken on the responsibility of communication liaison. You have set high standards for excellence in all aspects of your work on this project and have gained the respect of managers from both agencies. A great deal of the credit for this project's success goes to you."

Collin Eagles-Smith accepts award Josh Ackerman accepts award
Above left: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service fish and wildlife biologist Collin Eagles-Smith (left photograph, larger version) and USGS wildlife biologist Josh Ackerman (right photograph, larger version) accept DOI Superior Service Awards from USGS Acting Western Regional Director Anne Kinsinger for their research on the effects of mercury on bird reproduction in the San Francisco Bay and Delta.

Ackerman was the lead USGS scientist for this high-visibility research program. Addressing Ackerman at the ceremony, Brian Cole said: "Your exceptional performance, especially in coordinating USGS research efforts with other researchers, has exceeded normal expectations, while your outstanding mentoring skills have guided other field and laboratory technicians toward meeting your high standards of excellence. You have accepted a high level of responsibility to make sure the project succeeds through coordinating sample collection and preparation, data analysis, interpretation, and report writing. In addition, you have developed and given comprehensive, professional presentations to the research team and managers from multiple agencies. The joint research team has received high praise from CALFED, as well as from the State of California, other State and Federal agencies, and Congressional Representatives. It is largely because of you that this project has been successful for the USGS, and it is a pleasure to present to you the Superior Service Award of the Department of the Interior and the U.S. Geological Survey for your outstanding contributions."


Related Web Sites
James R. Winton employee profile
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)
R. Mike Anthony staff biography
U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)

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Research
cover story:
Effects of CO2 Levels on Marine Life and Global Climate

Underwater Photographic Tripod for Coral-Reef Studies

Outreach "Disasterville" Exhibit at Florida Museum

New Web site: Topics in Coastal and Marine Sciences

Meetings Exploring the Deep Biosphere

New Directions in Geographic Visualization of Scientific Data

Awards Western Region Biologists Receive 2006 DOI Honor Awards

USGS Ridge-to-Reef Team Honored for Work in Hawaiian Islands

Publications Video Footage of Pacific Ocean Bottom Transferred to DVD

Jan. / Feb. Publications List


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