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Meetings

International Workshop on High-Seas Biogeography Held in Mexico


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members of the "Benthic" working group at the Marine Biogeography Workshop pose around a projected map showing the rough results of the day's discussions
Above: Members of the "Benthic" working group at the Marine Biogeography Workshop pose around a projected map showing the rough results of the day's discussions on how to define biogeographic zones in the world ocean. USGS marine geologist Kathy Scanlon is second from right. [larger version]
A Scientific Experts' Workshop on Biogeographic Classification Systems in Open Ocean and Deep Seabed Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction was held at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in Mexico City, Mexico, from January 22 to 24, 2007. U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) marine geologist Kathy Scanlon joined about 30 other scientists from around the world to begin developing a comprehensive biogeographic classification of open-ocean and deep-seabed areas beyond national jurisdiction, based on the latest information available from expert scientists. Establishing a biogeographic classification system is widely viewed as an essential first step toward integrated oceans management because it helps us understand how and where species are distributed, and provides a basis for the study, conservation, and management of ocean resources. In the open ocean and deep seabed, biogeographic classification systems are far less developed than in terrestrial, coastal, and continental-shelf areas, where biogeographic maps have long helped support ecosystem-based management.

Over the next year, the workshop participants will build on existing relevant global and regional data sets and utilize the experience of coastal states and regional management bodies to develop a worldwide high-seas biogeographic classification system. The resulting classification will assist international and regional management bodies to establish sound and equitable management policies with a scientific foundation.

The workshop was sponsored by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)'s Division of Ecological and Earth Sciences, the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM), Mexico's National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity (CONABIO), UNESCO's Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, and IUCN-The World Conservation Union. The Governments of Australia and Canada and the J.M. Kaplan Fund provided financial support for the workshop.


Related Web Sites
United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)
United Nations
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
university
National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity
Mexican Government
IUCN-The World Conservation Union
conservation network
J.M. Kaplan Fund
foundation

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Research
cover story:
Deadly Tsunami Hits Solomon Islands

Tsunami-Forecasting System Tested by Recent Earthquakes

Sub-Sea-Floor Methane in the Bering Sea

Outreach USGS Donates Equipment to Local Nonprofit Theater

Meetings Getting to Know ET (Evapotranspiration)

International Workshop on High-Seas Biogeography

Awards USGS Researcher Receives Award from the American Society of Civil Engineers

USGS Sirenia Project Receives Manatee Hero Award

Publications

April Publications List


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