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Updated USGS Video "What Lies Beneath: Using Mangrove Peat to Study Ancient Coastal Environments and Sea-Level Rise"



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Ecologist William C. Vervaeke and research ecologist Karen L. McKee collecting a mangrove peat core on Twin Cays off the coast of Belize.
Above: Ecologist William C. Vervaeke (left) and research ecologist Karen L. McKee collecting a mangrove peat core on Twin Cays off the coast of Belize. Screenshot from USGS video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?
v=1o4nz0hbR8U&nsp;feature=youtube_gdata
. [larger version]

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently updated a 9-minute video describing how scientists study past changes in sea level and coastal environments by analyzing deep deposits of peat (organic soil) beneath mangrove islands off the coast of Belize. Produced by the USGS National Wetlands Research Center in 2009 and updated in 2011, the video features research ecologist Karen L. McKee and ecologist William C. Vervaeke collecting peat cores on Twin Cays, about 10 mi off the coast of Belize. The thick peat deposits underlying the mangrove islands retain a valuable record of past sea level, vegetation, and climate. By studying past changes in sea level and how intertidal ecosystems, such as mangroves, have responded to these changes, scientists can better predict what will happen in the future as sea levels increase. The information generated by such research is critical to modeling efforts, as well as to management and conservation of coastal ecosystems.

View the updated video, titled “What Lies Beneath: Using Mangrove Peat to Study Ancient Coastal Environments and Sea-Level Rise,” at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1o4nz0hbR8U&feature=youtube_gdata.

Additional information is available in the article “Belize Fieldwork Shows How Oceanic Mangrove Islands Kept Up With Sea-Level Rise for 8,000 Years,” Sound Waves, December 2009).

 

Related Sound Waves Stories
Belize Fieldwork Shows How Oceanic Mangrove Islands Kept Up With Sea-Level Rise for 8,000 Years
December 2009

Related Web Sites
What Lies Beneath: Using Mangrove Peat to Study Ancient Coastal Environments and Sea-Level Rise
YouTube

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in this issue:

Fieldwork
cover story:
Arctic Expedition Reaches 88.5 Degrees North Latitude

Collaborative Seafloor-Mapping Program Completes Final Surveys

Seafloor-Sampling Survey off Massachusetts

Research
Coral Reef Disease Hits Kāne'ohe Bay, Hawai'i

Climate Change Scenarios in California's Bay-Delta

Outreach
"Hurricane" Movie and TV Series to Feature USGS Scientists

Public Forum On Seafloor Mapping at the Ocean Explorium

Meetings
Working Sessions on Use Cases for Semantic-Web Development

Workshop on Fledermaus Software

Awards
Video Podcast Series Wins 2011 USGS Shoemaker Award

Staff Sedimentologist Arnold H. Bouma Passes Away

Publications Views of South San Francisco Bay Before Salt-Pond Restoration

Using Mangrove Peat to Study Ancient Coastal Environments and Sea-Level Rise

Jan. / Feb. 2012 Publications

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