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Spotlight on Sandy

New Tide Gage/Weather Station Installed in Collaboration with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, Mashpee, Massachusetts



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On July 11, 2014, representatives from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe, and the town of Mashpee, Massachusetts, gathered at the site of a newly installed tide gage/weather station at Mashpee Neck Landing on Popponesset Bay to participate in a demonstration of the gage’s construction and functionality.

Group at the tide gage location Richard Verdi explains how the data are collected and transmitted via satellite
Above Left: Group at the tide gage location discussing the functions of the gage, the data it will produce, and how it will help the Tribe and the Town in their natural-resource-management operations. Left to right: Richard Verdi, Supervisory Hydrologist, USGS New England Water Science Center (NEWSC); Andy Waite, Hydrologist, NEWSC; George “Chuckie” Green, Assistant Director, Department of Natural Resources, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe; Trish Keli’inui, Councilwoman, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe; Quan Tobey, Director, Department of Natural Resources, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe; Richard York, Shellfish Constable, Town of Mashpee, Massachusetts. Photograph by USGS National Tribal Liaison Monique Fordham. [larger version]

Above Right: Richard Verdi (left, USGS New England Water Science Center) explaining to Trish Keli’inui (Councilwoman, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe) and Quan Tobey (Director, Department of Natural Resources, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe) how the data are collected and transmitted via the satellite antenna to which the men are pointing. Photograph by USGS National Tribal Liaison Monique Fordham. [larger version]

This collaboration between the USGS and the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe was made possible by Department of the Interior (DOI) Hurricane Sandy supplemental funds (see Sound Waves story “USGS Research to Support Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Gets Boost from Supplemental Funds”). The tide gage/weather station was installed and activated on June 17 by the Massachusetts Office of the USGS New England Water Science Center and reports seven different parameters in near real-time: water level, rainfall, wind speed, wind direction, barometric pressure, relative humidity, and temperature. Data are recorded in 15-minute intervals and transmitted to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) every hour. Once transmitted, the data are automatically uploaded to the web in a matter of minutes. The real-time data are available at the USGS National Water Information System Web Interface, USGS 413601070275801 Popponesset Bay, Mashpee Neck Rd, Near Mashpee, MA.

Group viewing data on USGS National Water Information System Web Interface
Above: Group viewing data on USGS National Water Information System Web Interface (NWISWeb). Left to right: Andy Waite, Hydrologist, USGS New England Water Science Center (NEWSC); Trish Keli’inui, Councilwoman, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe; Quan Tobey, Director, Department of Natural Resources, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe; George “Chuckie” Green, Assistant Director, Department of Natural Resources, Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe; Richard York, Shellfish Constable, Town of Mashpee, Massachusetts; Monique Fordham, USGS National Tribal Liaison; Richard Verdi, Supervisory Hydrologist, NEWSC. Photograph by Christina Stringer, U.S. Forest Service. [larger version]

George “Chuckie” Green, Assistant Director for the Tribe’s Department of Natural Resources, stated that “accurate tidal data in the vicinity of the Tribe’s Popponesset Bay Restoration Project will finally give us a record of tide and storm surge to assist the Tribe in protection of our shellfish farm, coastline, wild resources and to prepare for the next major storm event. Being able to monitor and record temperature, wind, humidity, precipitation, rain fall, and barometric pressure will also support the Tribe’s Emergency Preparation Team efforts to establish a record of future storm events for planning purposes.”


Related Sound Waves Stories
USGS Research to Support Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Gets Boost from Supplemental Funds
Nov. / Dec. 2013
“Native Youth in Science–Preserving Our Homelands” Completes Year Two
Nov. / Dec. 2013

Related Websites
Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES)
NOAA
USGS 413601070275801 POPPONESSET BAY, MASHPEE NECK RD, NEAR MASHPEE, MA
USGS

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in this issue:

Spotlight on Sandy
USGS Coastal Change Hazards Portal

New Tide Gage/Weather Station Near Mashpee, Massachusetts

Oceanographic Gear Retrieved from Offshore of Fire Island, New York

Research
Coral Reefs Along West-Central Guam—Historical Impacts

Geologic Evidence of Past Tsunamis in California

Outreach
USGS Helps Celebrate the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

Public Lecture on Deep-Sea Corals Takes Audience “Into the Abyss”

Meetings
USGS Gas Hydrates Project Hosts Japanese Colleagues

Use-Case Training for the Woods Hole, Massachusetts, Research Community

Spring 2014 Monterey Bay Marine GIS User Group Meeting

Publications
July / August Publications

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